The Game of "Go" and Management

I have become absolutely crazy about Go.

I took it up at the end of last year (2001) for two reasons. First of all, a friend invited me to play. At that time, my mountain lodge project (refer to "The Mountain Lodge Project") was moving ahead, and a friend who lived nearby had suggested that we should spend the evenings playing Go together. In fact, I did not have much idea about how I would spend my evenings in the mountains, so this planted a seed in my mind.

There was another reason—I had turned 40. I wanted to do something to mark a complete departure from being in my thirties. And the fact that my father had been a Go player also had an influence.

Work had slowed down a little, so I began learning how to play Go during the end-of-the-year holidays. At first, I didn't know what was going on. In fact, I was utterly clueless. I couldn't make heads or tails of the game. The only thing to do was to plunge in and get familiar by actually playing the game instead of just studying it, so that's what I did. However, even that approach took a lot of time.

First of all, you've got to get your head around the terminology. In Go, there are words like "kosumi" (diagonal move), "tobi" (jump), "tsuke" (contact play), "keima" (knight jump), "kou" (no repetition of the same shape), "hiraki" (extension), "shimari" (corner enclosure), all of which are for some reason written in Japanese katakana script. It took some time to get used to these terms, but there's no way to avoid learning the language of the game.

Next, you need to pick up the basic concepts of Go. The rules are actually rather simple, but I had real trouble with the concepts. For example, it took me a long time to understand the concepts of "two eyes," "match ending" and what determines the life and death of stones, or who wins and who loses.

Then there is the strategy for winning. Even if you've gotten the language and rules down, in order to win you must to acquire at the very least a basic foundation of knowledge. For example, at the absolute minimum, you have to pick up formulas like set sequences and critical moves, or be familiar with Go problems based on life-and-death and the tightening play. The only way to obtain this package of knowledge is by reading books, and I think I bought more than 30 of them.

At first, I read beginner books, then moved on to intermediate, and finally advanced level ("first dan level"), gradually taking on a higher degree of difficulty. It was kind of like studying for an entrance exam for university; I read them over and over again, marking an "x" with a red pen by the parts I couldn't solve and coming back to them later. "This is all about repetition and persistence," I told myself and kept on studying.

During that period, I had almost given up all other reading, and the stack of books I intended to read later began filling up my shelves. The only books I took along on overseas business trips were those on Go. I'm used to reading books on history and economics and usually devour them in no time, but studying books about Go can take hours and hours.

Next I began to get actual match experience to deepen my understanding of the game. This could only be done here and there, in between family and work commitments. It was very difficult to find the time.

A short time after starting Go, a female manager, one of my acquaintances, told me, "I started playing Go, and within a year and a half I made the first dan level." This really got my goose, and my competitive spirit was fired up. I made up my mind that if she could get to the first dan level in 18 months, I could do it in a year. I even told others that this was my plan. My family responded by saying that if I didn't make it, I would have to give up Go altogether. The pressure was on.

Over the summer, Go became my entire life. I must have played some 50 matches in a month. Family time shifted to the back burner, as I was consumed by the game. Nevertheless, I still had work to do and finding the time was tough. I had to plan very carefully to make sure I was using the time I invested in Go as effectively as possible. So I started keeping a diary and went over each game, looking for mistakes, isolating problems and then striving to solve them. I started going to a Go salon, and learned by playing matches with an instructor.

Starting in September, fully prepared, I began to enter matches with an eye toward achieving the first dan level.

Victory completely eluded me. I lost five matches in a row. Little by little, my guts began to weaken. Losing at Go means crumbling until you are completely torn. It can be so miserable that you feel like crying. Yet, I spurred myself on to keep trying.

Three weeks later, I tasted victory for the first time by winning my sixth match. I was so overjoyed by this first ever win that I could hardly contain myself. I was so thrilled that I invited all the students and staff in a GMS (Globis Management School) study session to go out drinking, and we ended up staying out till dawn.

Playing Go after this initial victory was all about ebbs and flows. Just when I thought I was winning, I would be defeated. However, I was definitely beginning to win more often.

Three months had passed since I initially attempted to gain the first dan level, and on the Beaujolais Nouveau release day in November, I took the afternoon off from work and went to an authorized Nihon Ki-in (Japan Go Association) tournament. Just one month was left in the year in which I had sworn that I would obtain the first dan. I pulled myself together and the tournament began. I won my first match, and then my third. Yes!! I had actually succeeded in obtaining the first dan level of Go! I was higher than the moon.

Of course, as soon as the match was over I dived right into the Beaujolais Nouveau. Maybe it was the stress that had built up over such a long period of time, but that night I ended up drinking until five in the morning. I was really clobbered, but I felt great and refreshed.

A little while after I had reached the first dan level, I was at last able to calm down again mentally and could begin to focus on other things.

Why is Go so fascinating? How did I get that into it? I plan to write a column about the relationship between Go and management.

Mr. Yoshito Hori established GLOBIS Management School in 1992 and GLOBIS Capital Partners in 1996. In 2003, GLOBIS started its original MBA program which, in 2006, received accreditation from the Japanese Ministry of Education and gained “university” status. GLOBIS started a part-time MBA program in English in 2009 and a full-time MBA program in English in 2012.

A Harvard MBA graduate and former Sumitomo Corporation employee, Mr. Hori founded the Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) Japan Chapter in 1995 and became the first board member from Asia in charge of Asia Pacific region in 1996. He also served on the World Economic Forum (WEF)’s New Asian Leaders Executive Committee and Global Agenda Council on New Models of Leadership, as well as the Harvard Business School Alumni Board from 2005 to 2008. Currently, Mr. Hori is a board member of the Keizai Doyukai (Japan Association of Corporate Executives), and serves as co-chair of WEF’s Global Growth Companies.

In 2008, he launched the G1 Summit – a Japanese version of the WEF’s annual Davos forum. This led to the foundation of G1 Summit Institute in 2013, which Mr. Hori serves as Representative Director.

Just days after a huge earthquake struck northeast Japan in March 2011, Mr. Hori launched Project KIBOW to support the rebuilding of the disaster-affected areas. The following year Project KIBOW was incorporated as the KIBOW Foundation, which Mr. Hori serves as Representative Director.

An avid enthusiast of the Japanese game Go since age 40, Mr. Hori has been Director of the Nihon Ki-in (Japan Go Association) since June 2013.

Since October 2013, Mr. Hori has hosted a weekly TV program in Japan called Nippon Mirai Kaigi (Japan Future Conference). He has authored several books including Visionary Leaders who Create and Innovate Societies, Six Dimensions of Life, and My Personal Mission Statement.

Mr. Hori received his BS in Engineering from Kyoto University and his MBA from Harvard Business School.

He is an avid swimmer and enjoys spending time with his family, especially his five sons.

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